A-Z Plant Care

Aglaonema

Aglaonemas are more commonly known as Chinese Evergreen plants, even though they are native to tropical and sub-tropical regions of Asia and New Guinea.

It’s a favourable houseplant because of their lovely foliage. They are also on NASA’s list of air-purifying plants!

Water- This plant requires a well-draining potting mix and to be watered around once a week. This plant likes to be evenly moist, watering more in the warmer months. Try not to water the fronds, just the soil. Water with room temperature water to prevent shock.

Light- This plant likes low to medium light levels. The lighter the leaf colour, the brighter the light required. Aglaonema with darker coloured leaves can thrive in lower light levels. Avoid direct light as this can burn the leaves!

This plant can be toxic if ingested.

Air Plants

The next big thing – Tillandsia, commonly known as Air Plants! When we say air plants, we mean no soil needed! They’re a type of Epiphyte, meaning in nature they grow on other plants, clinging to trees and hidden amongst rocks. There’s over 500 varieties of Air Plants, all wonderfully unique.

They look lovely in their own little terrarium or sitting on a shelf. You can get creative with where you place yours! Though they look cute in a glass container, make sure it isn’t a closed container and that the plant is getting enough air circulation. It’s in the name.

Light – Grows happily in bright, indirect light. Avoid direct light as this can burn the foliage.

Water – Submerge plant in a bowl of distilled water once a week or more depending on how sunny/warm it’s been, for around 20 mins, then give a wee shake to get rid of any excess water.

This plant is pet-friendly.

Alocasias

Alocasia plants are popular houseplants due to their stunning foliage, making their way to our living rooms in the 1950s. Part of the Arum family and native to the rainforests of Southeast Asia, there are around 80 species of this tropical plant. Great for collecting!

In Buddhist culture, Alocasia are considered to bring good luck and is often found at Buddhist temples in Laos and Thailand!

Water- Alocasias require a well-draining potting mix and likes to be kept moist. Be mindful of overwatering, little and often from the bottom. Mist your Alocasia regularly to increase humidity so it feels like it’s at home in the rainforest!

Light- These plants loves bright, indirect sunlight. Part sun and part shade is perfect. Never allow this plant to stand in direct sunlight as the leaves will burn. It can survive in shadier spots but do best with a little bit of sunshine.

This plant can be toxic if ingested. 

Anthurium

The Flamingo Flower (Anthurium) is known for its long-lasting, bold & glossy ‘flowers’. Anthurium flowers aren’t actually flowers, they’re spathes – colourful leaves that attract insects in the wild.

The most common Anthurium cultivated as a house plant is Anthurium Andreanum, loved for its heart-shaped, colourful leaves – usually red, pink or white.

Water– This plant requires a well-draining potting mix and loves a bit of moisture. They’re rainforest plants so you can imagine they love a warm, humid spot in your home. Try not to let the plant fully dry out, watering when the top couple of inches feels dry to the touch.

Light- Flamingo Flowers do well in bright, indirect sunlight. Avoid direct sun in the height of the Summer.

This plant can be toxic if ingested.

Begonia

Begonias come in countless colours, shapes and sizes. There are four main types: fibrous, tuberous, canes, and rhizomatous.

The fibrous (also called wax begonias) and tuberous types are usually used in garden beds. They are generally selected for their flowers rather than their foliage, whereas indoor Begonias are known for their dramatic leaves.

Cane Begonias have tall stems with downward pointing, teardrop-shaped leaves and Rhizomatous grow from a stubby stem structure, called a Rhizome.

Water– This plant requires a well-draining potting mix and loves frequent watering over the growing season (late Spring-early Autumn) cut back over the winter but never let it get really dry. Low humidity will cause the leaves to crisp at the edges. Give it a mist in the morning to help boost humidity. 

Light- Cane begonias need bright, indirect sunlight but be careful not to place the plant too close to a window in the height of Summer as the leaves can burn. Rhizomatous begonias enjoy a bit more shade. 

This plant can be toxic if ingested.

Bird of Paradise

It’s hard not to fall in love with the glossy, green leaves of the Bird of Paradise (Strelitzia Nicolai). The slits/breakage in your Bird of Paradise’s leaves aren’t typically a worry. These slits occur naturally in the wild, helping the plant become more aerodynamic in the wind and rain!

Light – This plant likes bright, indirect light but can also tolerate lower levels of light. It’s relatively hardy, adapting to a wide spectrum of light conditions!

Water – Water when the top 2-3 inches of soil feel dry to the touch. Reduce watering in winter.

This plant can be toxic if ingested.

Cacti

All cactus plants are members of the Cactaceae family. The word ‘cactus’ derives from the Ancient Greek word kaktos, named after a spiky plant. There are thousands of cactus species that come in an infinite array of shapes and sizes. Cacti are slow growing, drought tolerant and are one of the easiest plants to care for.

Water- As a general rule for cacti, be as light-handed with watering as possible. Allow the soil to nearly dry out between watering. This plant can cope with some neglect but will appreciate more watering in the warmer months, cut back in the Winter. Shrivelling can be a sign of under watering so try watering more regularly.

Light- Cacti appreciate a lot of sunlight, especially in the morning. They need at least 12 hours of sunlight a day so a sunny windowsill is perfect for them.

Most cacti are non-toxic, just a bit prickly! If unsure, please double check with Google/a member of staff.

Old Man Cactus

A white-grey fuzzy little prick.

Bunny Ear Cactus

Opuntia Microdasys is the cutest cactus – it’s nickname is Bunny Ear Cactus!

Desert Candle Cactus

The Euphorbia Acrurensis is more commonly known as the Desert Candle Cactus. Light up your urban jungle with this statement plant, which can grow to be 5-8ft indoors.

Mistletoe Cactus

Not your typical cactus. Unlike the majority of cacti that grow in dry climates, the Mistletoe Cactus (Rhipsalis Baccifera) is a tropical succulent that thrives in warm, humid conditions.

Cereus Repandus

A classic, easy-growing cactus. The word Cereus is derived from Ancient Greek, meaning ‘torch or candle’, referring to the upright trunks of the plant.

Euphorbia Neorubella

Another unique variety of Euphorbia with two cylindrical stems with umbrella-like leaves on the top.

and sooo many more!

Callisia Turtle Vine

Introducing the Callisia Turtle Vine (Callisia Repens), a low maintenance, trailing succulent that can grow to roughly three metres long. It’s a close relative of the Tradescantia, so well known for its green and purple vibrant foliage.

Light – This plant enjoys bright, indirect light. Avoid direct sun to avoid scorching the leaves.

Water – Unlike most succulents, this plant loves moist soil. Once the pot begins to feel light when lifted, it’s time for another water. Let the top inch of soil dry before watering again.

This plant can be toxic if ingested.

Cryptanthus

Cryptanthus plants are part of the Bromeliad plant family and are native to Brazil. They’re often referred to as ‘Earth Stars’, due to their star shaped leaves and the flatness of the plant. Despite the flat shape, these plants can reach up to two feet wide. With over 1,200 different varieties, Cryptanthus plants have incredibly varies and beautiful foliage.

Water– This plant likes a free-draining potting mix, adequate moisture in the summer, and relatively drier conditions in the winter.

Let the water run out the bottom of the pot’s drainage holes and allow the soil to almost dry out between waterings.

Light– Cryptanthus plants enjoy bright, indirect sunlight. They need lots of light but not too much, UV rays can scorch the leaves and kill it!

This plant is non-toxic.

Dieffenbachia

Dieffenbachia, or sometimes called Dumb Cane, is a beautiful foliage plant from the tropics of Mexico, South America, and the West Indies. It gets the nickname Dumb Cane from the fact that the liquid that drips from its leaves can cause a temporary loss of speech if ingested. It sounds scary but it’s not!

It’s super easy to care for and has dramatic, variegated foliage of green and white.

Dieffenbachia was given its name in the 1800s by Heinrich Wilhelm Scott, director of the Viennese Botanical Gardens, after his head gardener, Joseph Dieffenbach.

Water- This plant requires a well-draining potting mix and to be watered usually one a week or when the top couple of inches of soil have dried. The plant appreciates occasional misting.

Light- Dieffenbachia like lots of bright, indirect sunlight. Avoid direct light as its leaves can burn!

This plant can be toxic if ingested.

Dracaena

The Dracaena plant, also known as the Dragon Tree, is a popular houseplant due to its low maintenance and appearance. Dracaena plants differ in size, shape and colour and are all easy to care for plants! This spiky little tree can grow up to approximately 6ft tall. The name Dracaena comes from the Ancient Greek for ‘female dragon’.

Water– Like many drought tolerant plants, it can be easy to over water Dracaena plants. To avoid root rot, only water when half of the soil has dried.

If the plant develops brown tips on its leaves, that’s usually a sign of overwatering or that the water being used has too much salt or fluoride. Using distilled water is best for all your plants! If the plant develops yellow leaves, it’s usually a sign that it needs more water.

Light– Dracaenas will live happily in bright, indirect light but avoid direct sunlight.

This plant can be toxic if ingested. 

Ferns

Ferns are one of the oldest plants on Earth. They’re air-purifying, tropical plants – adding vibrant greens to a shadier spot in your indoor jungle. It’s a great plant for kitchens, bathrooms or anywhere that gets a little humid – they love humidity.

Because Ferns have been around a long time, there are many varieties of the plant.

Popular Ferns

Boston Fern

Nephrolepis, also known as the Sword Fern or Boston Fern, boasts some of the most fabulous, frondy-foliage.

Crispy Wave Fern

Wave hello to Asplenium Antiquum, a tropical plant more commonly known as Bird’s Nest Fern or Crispy Wave Fern.

Staghorn Fern

The Platycerium Bifurcatum is more commonly known as the Staghorn Fern, due to its antler-like leaves. Platycerium Bifurcatum is derived from the Greek words, platys meaning broad, ceras meaning horn, and bifurcate means to fork into two!

Maidenhair Fern

This frilly little plant is the Maidenhair Fern (Adiantum Raddianum). The botanical name Adiantum derives from the Greek word ‘unwetted’-  referring to the plants ability to shed water from its leaves when it rains!

Blue Star Fern

Phlebodium Aureum, commonly known as the Blue Star Fern, has been cultivated as a medicine to treat all sorts of conditions from asthma to psoriasis, as well as being a beautiful blue-green houseplant!

and many more…

During the Victorian era, collecting Ferns was so popular that there was a name for it – Pteridomania.  

Water- Ferns require a well-draining potting mix and to be watered thoroughly when the top 2/3 inches of soil has dried. Because they are tropical plants, they like to be kept moist but never too soggy. To increase the humidity around your plants, give the area a slight mist in the morning or sit on a tray of wet pebbles. There’s also lots of little USB humidifiers for roughly £10-£20 online!

Avoid watering the central rosette/leaves as this could encourage root rot.

Light – Most Ferns are a shade-loving plants that will burn in direct sunlight. They can manage bright, filtered light but do best in partial shade.

These plants are generally non-toxic.

Ficus

Ficus is a genus of around 900 species of trees, shrubs and vines in the Moraceae family. You’ll often hear them called Fig Trees due to the fruit they grow in their tropical habitat.

Water- These plants require a well-draining potting mix and watering when the top 2-3 inches of soil have dried. Try not to let the plant dry out completely. If you notice the leaves starting to yellow, the plant is probably not getting enough water. Some leaf loss is totally normal (especially near Winter), but if lots of leaves begin to drop/break off it’s usually a watering issue.

Light- Ficus plants enjoy a brightly lit spot, avoiding direct sunlight in the height of summer. They can be pretty happy in shadier spots but you’ll often notice smaller and/or less foliage.

These plants can be toxic if ingested. 

Though there is so many Ficus varieties, only a few are cultivated as house plants. Here’s a few fabulous Ficus…

Ficus Elastica

Also known as the Rubber Plant, getting its name from the white latex coursing through its veins, once used to make rubber.

Ficus Benjamina

Known as the Weeping Fig Tree, their glossy, tear-shaped leaves make for a fabulous indoor Ficus.

Ficus Lyrata

Probably the largest leaves of all the indoor Ficus plants – the Fiddle Leaf Fig.

Fittonia

Fittonia plants (also known as the Nerve plant, Mosaic plant and Net plant) are colourful little beauties, originally from Peru. A member of the Acanthaceae family, these tropical plants have beautiful green leaves with accented veins of white to pink and a layer of fuzz! In the rainforest they grow as ground cover. Because of this, they stay relatively small – an excellent choice for a terrarium.

This plant likes a lot of TLC and be a bit of a drama queen so here are our care tips:

Water- Fittonias will tell you when they’re thirsty. They’ll wilt and generally look a bit sad. They require a well-draining potting mix and to be kept consistently moist but not too soggy. Try not to let the soil completely dry out. Water thoroughly when the top 2 inches of soil has dried.

Light- The Fittonia plant prefers bright, indirect light. Brighter light can bring out the vibrancy of the leaves but too much can cause the leaves to burn.

Fittonias are considered non-toxic.

Hoya

Hoya plants are often nicknamed ‘Wax Flowers’, due to their unreal looking leaves. Hoyas were introduced]\75rrv

Water- This little plant is very low maintenance. Let soil dry completely before deeply watering, avoiding getting water on the leaves.

Light- This plant likes bright, indirect light and can sometimes tolerate lower levels of light. On super sunny days, move your plant a couple of feet back from bright windows as the leaves can burn.

This plant can be toxic if ingested. 

Lipstick Plant

The Lipstick Plant (Aeschynanthus), is a beautiful trailing plant that produces little red flowers, that kind of look like lipstick tubes, adding a pop of colour to your urban jungle. Aeschynanthus is derived from the Greek word ‘aischyne‘, which means shame and refers to the scarlet colour of the flowers. ‘Anthos‘ means flower.

Light – This plant appreciates bright, indirect light. If leaves start to yellow, gradually introduce the plant to more light. Avoid direct sunlight.

Water – Water once the top two inches of soil feel dry to the touch. Try not to let the soil dry completely.

This plant is considered to be non-toxic .

Monstera Deliciosa

Monstera Deliciosa, translates as ‘delicious monster’. The monster part is likely because of its huge, glossy leaves and large aerial roots, while the delicious refers to the tasty fruit this plant grows in the wild. 

Commonly nicknamed the Swiss Cheese Plant due to unique holes in the leaves, said to resemble some Swiss cheeses! Before Monstera leaves mature, their heart-shaped leaves have no holes and look similar to those of Pothos leaves. An exciting plant to watch grow as every leaf that uncurls is unique. It’s a real statement plant!

Water- This plant requires a well-draining potting mix and likes to be watered around once a week. If you’re unsure, pop a finger in the soil and water when the top 2-3 inches have dried up. Let the water fully drain out the bottom of the pot then leave to drip dry – don’t leave it sitting in water as this can cause root rot. 

Light- This plant likes bright, indirect light and can sometimes tolerate lower levels of light. On super sunny days, move your plant a couple of feet back from bright windows as the leaves can burn.

This plant can be toxic if ingested. 

Monstera Minima

Rhaphidophora Tetrasperma, commonly named Monstera Minima or Mini Monstera, is a fast-growing vining plant– perfect for hanging baskets or coir poles! The Monstera Minima is a tropical plant native to Thailand and Malaysia. Closely resembling the Monstera Deliciosa, this plant is from the Araceae family.

Unlike the Monstera Deliciosa the unique leaf holes (fenestration), that Monstera plants are known for appear at a younger age.

Water- This plant requires a well-draining potting mix and likes to be watered around once a week. If you’re unsure, pop a finger in the soil and water when the top 2-3 inches have dried up. Let the water fully drain out the bottom of the pot, don’t leave it sitting in water as this can cause root rot. 

Light- This plant likes bright, indirect light and can sometimes tolerate lower levels of light.

This plant can be toxic if ingested.

Palms

Perhaps because of their association with tropical environments, Palms seem to bring a sense of peace and relaxation to a home. There’s over 2,750 varieties of Palm trees, though just a fabulous few are grown as houseplants. Here’s some of the most common indoor Palms;

  • Chinese Fan Palm (Livistona Chinensis)
  • Areca Palm (Dypsis Lutescens)
  • Majestic Palm (Ravenea Rivularis)
  • Cascade Palm (Chamaedorea Cataractarum)
  • Parlous Palm (Chamaedorea Elegans)
  • Ponytail Palm (Beaucarnea Recurvata)
  • Sago Palm (Cycas Revoluta)
  • Yucca Palm (Yucca Elephantipes)

Water– Palms generally like to be evenly moist but not too soggy/waterlogged. Let the water run out the bottom of the pot’s drainage holes and allow the soil to almost dry out between waterings.

Light– Palms are suited to bright, indirect light and can often tolerate lower light levels.

Palms are generally non-toxic, minus the Sago and Yucca Palm. Always double check with the auld Google if unsure.

Pancake Plant

The Pancake Plant’s Sunday name is Pilea Peperomioides – a bit of a mouthful so we like its nickname, Pancake Plant. It gets the name because of its circular green leaves. They’re native to Southern China so also gets called Chinese Money Plant.

Pileas are part of the Urticaceae family, a family of plants that are often considered ‘weedy’. Not only can plants of the Urticaceae family be beautiful, ornamental houseplants, like Pileas, some Urticaceae plants are used as a medicinal herbal tea!

Water- This plant requires a well-draining potting mix and to be watered when the top 2-3 inches of soil has dried. Water moderately during the warmer months and less in Winter. When things get too dry or too moist, the plant tends to droop and leaves start to flop so always check the soil before watering. 

Light- This is a low maintenance plant that thrives in a bright spot near a window, but it’s best to keep the plant out of direct sunlight as too much can cause the leaves to burn. Be sure to rotate your Pancake Plant frequently as it will grow towards the light.  

This plant is non-toxic.

Peperomia

There are thousands of plants in the Peperomia genus, all so incredibly unique and best of all, low maintenance! Some get confused for succulents due to their plump leaves and ability to withstand a little neglect.

Water- These plants requires a well-draining potting mix and to be watered when the top 2-3 inches of soil has dried. Water less in Winter and never leave standing in water for long. They can be fairly drought tolerant but try not to let the soil dry completely.

Light- This is a low maintenance plant that thrives in a medium to bright spot, avoiding direct sunlight.

Peperomia plants are considered to be non-toxic.

Philodendron

The Philodendron genus contains many popular houseplants with bold, trailing foliage. They’re part of the Araceae family and with nearly 500 species, you’re spoilt for choice.

Its name comes from the Greek words for love (Philo) and tree (Dendron) – pretty cute!

Although these plants are native to the West Indies and tropical rainforests of Central and South America, they are low maintenance plant that can adapt to all kinds of environments as long as you keep them warm, avoid cold drafts and give them lots of compliments.

Water– Philodendron require a well-draining potting mix. Allow the top 2/3 inches of soil to dry out before watering. They’re fairly drought tolerant but try not to let the soil fully dry out.

Light– Philodendron will live happily in bright, indirect light but avoid direct sunlight to avoid burning the leaves.

This plant can be toxic if ingested. 

Popular Philodendrons

Scandens

Philodendron Scandens is often called the ‘Sweetheart Plant’ due to its heart-shaped leaves. This delightful trailing plant is low maintenance and home decor must.

Red Beauty

The Philodendron ‘Red Beauty’ steals the show in any urban jungle with its gorgeous, glossy, burgundy-green leaves.

Green Princess

The Philodendron ‘Green Princess’ is a bit more compact than other Philodendron plants, growing to the limited height of only 50-60cm.

Silver Queen

When the light hits the Philodendron ‘Silver Queen’, the pale green leaves shimmer silver hues at certain angles. It’s a striking addition to any houseplant collection.

and many more…

Pothos

Epipremnum Aureum is a fast-growing tropical vine, commonly known as Pothos or Devil’s Ivy. Native to South-East Asia, in its tropical environment this plant will grow up to 66 feet in length. Perfect for hanging baskets, trailing down a bookshelf or draping over a wall. Your jungle will be covered in these fast growing vines before you know it!

Pothos have evergreen, heart-shaped leaves with variegations of usually yellow, white or pale green. The most common Pothos plants are the Golden Pothos, Satin Pothos and Marble Pothos. They’re one of the easiest plants to care for and you’ll be surprised how tolerant they are!

Water – Pothos plants require a well-draining potting mix and like to be watered when the top 2/3 inches of soil has dried. Let the water fully drain out the bottom of the pot, don’t leave it sitting in water as this can cause root rot.

Light– This plant lives happily in indirect light as well as a little shade. The brighter the light, the more vibrant the Pothos’ variegation. Though be careful on super sunny days, moving your plant a couple of feet away from the window to avoid leaf burn.

This plant can be toxic if ingested.

Prayer Plants

Prayer Plant is the name given to a number of different plants that have two things in common – their care needs and the movement of their leaves. At night, the leaves will slowly close upright, almost like it’s ‘praying’, and in the morning they will slowly fold downwards again. They’re part of the Marantaceae family – the main varieties being Calathea, Ctenanthe and Maranta.

Water – Prayer plants require a well-draining potting mix and like to be watered when the top 2/3 inches of soil has dried. Let the water fully drain out the bottom of the pot, don’t leave it sitting in water as this can cause root rot. Try not to let your plant fully dry out, these are moisture loving, tropical plants.

Light– This plant lives happily in indirect light as well as a little shade. The brighter the light, the more vibrant the variegation. Though be careful on super sunny days, moving your plant a couple of feet away from the window to avoid leaf burn.

Most Prayer Plants are typically non-toxic. If unsure, check the auld Google/yer aunt Alexa.

Calatheas

Ctenanthes

Marantas

Sansevieria

Sansevieria, commonly known as the Snake Plant, is a hardy, air-purifying succulent native to West Africa. A member of the Asparagaceae family, there’s a few varieties differing in shape and variegation. The classic Sansi you’ll have seen with the yellow banding around green sword-shaped leaves in the Laurentii.

We love Sansevierias & with so many varieties, you’ll have yourself a collection of (almost) indestructible plants in no time.

Water- This plant likes a free-draining potting mix and to be watered every few weeks/once a month. You’ll need to water more during the warmer months, typically every 2 weeks. Reduce watering going into the Winter, as little as once a month. To avoid overwatering, only water when the soil has fully dried.

Light- These plants grow best in bright, filtered light but will still grow well in low light areas. 

This plant can be toxic if ingested. 

Spider Plant

Chlorophytum Comosum, commonly known as the Spider Plant, is made up of a rosette of long, arched foliage with green and white variegation. The dangly leaves and the pups (baby spider plats) it produces look like little spiders, hence the nickname. They’re super easy to care for and look great hanging or standing.

Gift your spider pups to your friends to share the plant love!

Water– This plant requires a well-draining potting mix and loves frequent watering over the growing season (late Spring-early Autumn) cut back over the winter but never let it get really dry. Low humidity will cause the leaves to crisp at the edges. Give it a mist in the morning to help boost humidity. Brown leaf tips can also be a sign of fluoride in the water. This isn’t harmful to the plant but we’d always recommend watering plants with filtered/distilled water.

Light– Spider Plants like lots of bright, indirect sunlight but avoid direct light as its leaves can burn!

This plant isn’t toxic to pets but cats do love a nibble so it’s best to keep them out of reach. Too much nibbling can lead to an upset tummy!

String of Hearts

Ceropegia Woodii or more commonly known as the String of Hearts is one of the most popular hanging/trailing plants in the UK. Native to South Africa, Swaziland and Zimbabwe, this plant and its heart-shaped foliage can reach up to 12 inches long. Its foliage is dark green marbled with silver, the undersides of the leaves have a pinkish-purple hue Perfect for draping down shelves or hanging baskets.  The String of Hearts is a forgiving plant, and great for beginners. As long as you don’t over-water your plant, it’ll just keep growing!

Water- This plant requires a well-draining potting mix and prefers periods of drought between its next watering. When the top 2/3 inches of soil has dried, then the plant is ready for a drink. Water less in winter. 

Light- This plant like bright light, including some direct early morning or evening sunlight – this will enhance the colour. 

This plant is considered non-toxic.

String of Pearls

Senecio Rowleyanus, also known as the String of Pearls is a hanging/trailing succulent vine, native to the drier parts of south west Africa. Its nickname ‘String of Pearls’ is due to its little bead-like leaves that grow either side of stems that can reach 2-3 feet long!

This succulent can bloom in the right conditions, where flowers appear as small, white fuzzy daisies that smell like cinnamon!

String of Pearls grow fast and propagate easily, making this the perfect hanging plant for beginners!

Water- This plant requires a well-draining potting mix and to be watered sparingly. Senecio are very drought tolerant, storing water in their leaves. Allow the soil to dry out between watering. Do not allow the plants to sit in water. 

Light- This plant likes bright, indirect light, especially some morning or late afternoon sun! 

This plant can be toxic if ingested. 

Succulents

Succulents come in every colour of the rainbow, varying in size, shape and form. The word ‘succulent’ comes from the Latin word sucus, meaning juice, or sap. Their fleshy leaves store water in their leaves and/or stems. These desert plants can be forgiving to forgetful plant parents, being pretty drought tolerant. One of the best qualities of succulents is their ability to propagate easily, by leaf cuttings or planting pups!

Water- Succulents require a well-draining potting mix. The more aeration the better. It can be easy to overwater succulents, so it’s best to let the soil fully dry before its next watering.

Light- These plants enjoys bright, filtered sunlight. Rotate succulents every so often so they grow evenly. Even desert plants can burn, so be careful on those super sunny days to move your succulent a little further from the light.

Most succulents are non-toxic but there are a few that can cause harm. Always do a quick Google search if unsure.

Popular Succulents

Echeveria

Echeverias are a large genus of rosette-forming succulent plants. They’re easy to care for and come in over 160 shapes, colours and sizes. You’ll be collecting them in no time! 

Sedum Morganianum

The Sedum Burro’s Tail (Sedum Morganianum) is a trailing succulent with little, plump, blue-green leaves. They grow to be roughly 2 feet long, perfect for hanging baskets.

Hoya Kerrii

A beautiful trailing succulent with heart-shaped leaves. They’re often sold as a single leaf – a perfect wee gift for yourself or a loved one.

Crassula Hottentot

Crassula Hottentot is a funky little succulent with many names; Jade Necklace, Chinese Pagoda, Worm Plant. We like to use its botanical name, Crassula Hottentot, because it’s fun to say. Hottentot.

String of Pearls

The String of Pearls (Senecio Rowleyanus) is a wonderful trailing succulent with oval, bead-like leaves.

and so many more…

Syngonium

The Arrowhead Plant/Vine (Syngonium) gets its common name from the arrow-shaped leaves that it has when it’s young, growing in to a beautiful vine with age. Syngoniums come in a variety of colours

Water- This plant requires a well-draining potting mix and to be watered thoroughly when top couple of inches of soil has dried out. This is usually every 2 weeks but can vary depending on weather and room humidity. Keep the soil moist during the growing period (Spring/Summer).

Light- Syngoniums like lots of bright, indirect sunlight. The brighter the light, the more vibrant the leaves but avoid direct light as its leaves can burn!

This plant can be toxic if ingested.

Tradescantia

Tradescantia, also known as the Inch Plant, are loved for their colourful variegation. Native to North and South America, there are around 60 species, of which most are hanging plants. The foliage comes in a variety of colours, ranging from green, yellow, white, purple, pink and silver!

Like succulents, the stems store a fair amount of water, meaning the Tradescantia is quite forgiving if you forget to water it from time to time.

Water– This plant requires a well-draining potting mix and to be watered thoroughly when the top couple of inches of soil have dried. Don’t let the soil dry out completely.

Light- Tradescantia like bright, indirect light. If the plant isn’t getting enough light, you’ll notice that their leaf markings begin to fade. Direct sun, however, will scorch their leaves (with the exception being the purple queen variety, which loves full sun).

This plant can be toxic if ingested.

ZZ Plant

Zamioculas Zamiifolia is an easy going, drought tolerant plant that’s native to Africa. A couple of decades ago, Dutch plant nurseries landed in South Africa and saw the propagation potential of the ZZ plant. In 1996 they started to distribute the ZZ around the world and it’s been a popular houseplant ever since!

Water- This plant requires a well-draining potting mix and to be watered thoroughly when 50% of soil has dried. Let the plant drip dry before placing in a decorative pot. Never let it sit in water for long periods of time as this can encourage root rot!

Light – ZZ plants appreciate bright, indirect light. Avoid direct light to avoid burning the leaves. They’re also tolerant to lower light conditions, making an excellent addition to a shady corner of your home.

This plant can be toxic if ingested.